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What is the Discipleship Training School about? Reflecting the Son
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Life in Muizenberg – Turning Visitors into Locals
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Seeing from God’s Perspective
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I Want To Read The Bible More
5
The Beauty of Dependence
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Don’t Leave Home Without Him
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Immigrants, Orphans, and Jesus
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I See Gold in Ocean View – My First Three Weeks
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Who Do I Value? How About Those Untrained, Ordinary, or Young?
10
I Struggle With Fear. Now What?

What is the Discipleship Training School about? Reflecting the Son

Photo Credit: Michael and Stephanie Chesterman

Michael and Stephanie Chesterman are leading the upcoming Discipleship Training School (DTS) at YWAM Muizenberg, which begins June 22nd. Recently, I heard Michael speak about the DTS. I was so moved by his passion for the school as he shared how God will transform the students’ lives and work through them to impact the nations! So if you’re wondering about DTS or doing a DTS at YWAM Muizenberg, here’s a little nugget, from this school’s leaders Michael and Stephanie, of what God has in store for you during the Reflecting the Son DTS!

As Christians, we are called to be ambassadors for Christ. We are to reflect what Christ has done for us and in us to those around us. Christ set an example for the disciples, and so we are to be an example to the world. Paul says that we are to always have a testimony. It is said that actions speak louder than words. Does the way we live our lives give an accurate testimony of what God has done in and for us?

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Life in Muizenberg – Turning Visitors into Locals

Photo Credit: Kenny Hall via instagram @lovemuiz

There are many facets to being a part of Youth With A Mission in Muizenberg, South Africa, a beautiful, southern suburb of Cape Town. As students in our schools or on staff with local ministries here, we may study and minister A Lot of the time. But another important aspect to living and making home is for family and friendships, rest and rejuvenation; so let’s rejoice in Muizenberg as a blessing and displaying God’s beauty in so many ways. Here’s to a little taste of Muizenberg, which Kenny brings so well in this post. You may become a local too. (Check out more breathtaking photos of Muizenberg on instagram @lovemuiz.)

Muizenberg, perhaps more than any other place I’ve been in the world, is known for turning visitors into locals. With its rich history dating back to the 1740’s, the streets and walls of Muizenberg are filled with stories, and they have a way of captivating. There’s also no doubt that Muizenberg attracts a very diverse crowd of people.

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Seeing from God’s Perspective

Photo Credit: Kathy Gooch

This post was originally published on the Kathy Gooch’s blog at http://scribeofhisheart.blogspot.com/2014/03/seeing-from-gods-perspective.html and is re-posted with permission.

As a full-time missionary for the past 18 years and before that taking short-term missions trips, I’ve had the privilege of traveling all over the world. I’ve seen firsthand (although not climbed!) many mountain ranges – some of the better known ones being the Himalayas, the Alps, the Rockies, the East African Highlands, and the Andes. I’ve even seen the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro from the airplane. All have been spectacular sightings that have been kept as snapshots in my memory bank.

I moved from Zimbabwe to Cape Town in 2009. In the suburb I live in, I can walk out my front door and see the ocean, and I can walk out my back door and see the mountains. More spectacular sightings. As I’m not so partial to the ocean, I’ve kept it as a spectacular sighting. For some reason, I’ve been drawn to the mountains and haven’t been satisfied leaving them as mere sightings. As intimidating as they are, I’ve wanted to experience them. The only way one can truly experience these mountains is to go through the grueling process of climbing them!

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I Want To Read The Bible More

Photo credit: rennes.i via photopin cc

This post was originally published on the Chris Lautsbaugh’s blog at http://www.nosuperheroes.com/read-the-bible-more/ and is re-posted with permission.

I’ve had a lot of history with reading the Bible. I teach it, I study it, and I do desire others to love it more. In my years I’ve tried many a Bible reading plan.

You know, the ones with the beautiful little boxes you can check off after reading! Those boxes that make you feel like you have done your duty to God and country yet don’t help you remember what you read 10 minutes after closing your beautiful, leather-bound study Bible!

I used to read the passages in the reading plan and check them off. Somehow, checking them off made me feel good. But, if I missed a day, I felt horrible.

It was almost as if I was trying to manipulate God, paying my dues so He would bless me.

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The Beauty of Dependence

Photo credit: Barbara Jackson via pixabay cc

I ask you to consider taking Cayla’s post to heart, whether encased by the mundane, the comforts or difficulties of home, whether battling tragedy personally or tragic, global headlines – near to home here in South Africa with xenophobia and recent violence or a bit further away – the devastating earthquakes in Nepal… There is Someone waiting for you, Not on “the other side” of tragedy or struggle, but He is With You In the struggle – regardless of it’s supposed size. He waits, for your independence to surrender.

This post was originally published on the Cayla Bertelsen’s blog at http://caylabertelsen.blogspot.com/2015/03/the-beauty-of-dependence.html and is re-posted with permission.

“I need you more, more than yesterday. I need you more, more than words can say. I need you more than ever before. I need you more; I need you, Lord.”

Today I was reflecting on my days in South Africa and the sweet intimacy with Jesus that I enjoyed in such a full measure. My heart longed to feel that nearness once again. I wanted to feel that familiar trust and peace that came from the constant running to Him.

I wondered for a minute, “Why? Why was there such a difference between that time and this?”

But right then, I knew what it was  – the amount of dependence.

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Don’t Leave Home Without Him

Photo Credit: Jason Hughes via Stocksnap.io cc

This post was originally published on the Kathy Gooch’s blog at  http://scribeofhisheart.blogspot.com/2014/11/dont-leave-home-without-it.html and is re-posted with permission.

I grew up in Canada watching a television ad for American Express traveler’s cheques whose slogan was “Don’t leave home without it.” I suppose American Express reckoned that not having their traveler’s cheques in your possession when you left home would set you up for challenges – ones that could have been prevented had you left home with them.

At the beginning of 2012, knowing that I would be phasing out of pastoring a church, I asked the Lord what I should focus on next. He made it clear that I was to be proactive in contributing to “eradicating Bible poverty and increasing Bible engagement.” He was basically saying that I could go “further with fewer” by having them “linger a little longer” in His Word.

Thus, I started Bible Studies with groups of young ladies. It was my way of creating an environment in which they could engage with the Word of God. I have been facilitating studies in the Word ever since with both young women and young men. Like the parable of the sower and the seed, I have seen a few who hear, receive the Word, and understand it, producing fruit. I would like to believe that those few have lived by the slogan, “Don’t leave home without it.”

Unfortunately, too many of us followers of Christ leave home without the Word.

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Immigrants, Orphans, and Jesus

Photo Credit: BruceEmmerling via Pixabay cc

This post was originally published on Lindsey Lautsbaugh’s blog at http://www.thisisloveactually.com/immigrants-orphans-jesus/ on December 1, 2014 and is re-posted with permission.

My maternal grandparents were immigrants from Norway. My Grandma Edie would enthrall me with the story of her first sighting of American soil. As a young girl, she peaked through the window of the ship, and there stood the Statue of Liberty on Ellis Island, New York City.

When Grandma Edie and Grandpa John fought around my sister and me, often they would do it in Norwegian so we couldn’t understand what they were saying! My grandmother made fish-balls and lutefisk and lefse. The town they lived in was full of Norwegian immigrants, and its official motto is still “Little Norway.”

Being surrounded by so many Norwegians brought the inevitable Swedish jokes. I just thought it was like an old high school rivalry. I didn’t know why Norwegians and Swedes teased each other; it’s just what we did. In fact, my Grandfather posted a sign at the top of his drive-way that said, “Norwegians Only! No Swedes Allowed!” Little did I know that this rivalry came out of a deep-rooted history. But it was all good fun for the family in those times.

The last two weeks I’ve thought a lot about my precious grandparents. I was always acutely aware we were a Norwegian-American family. But there was so much I never knew to ask them. They were immigrants. The family didn’t know English when they came, I know that. But what else? What was it like to be foreigners in a strange land?

The reason I thought of this was because I’ve been surrounded by a whole new set of “foreigners” here in South Africa. My husband and I bought a house, and we are doing a few renovations this month before we move in. We’ve had the privilege of hiring a number of men from Malawi to help us with some of the work.

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I See Gold in Ocean View – My First Three Weeks

Photo Credit: Rohit Padmanabhan via Unsplash

Just a month ago Tiffany Baca, the author of the below post, moved to South Africa to join the staff of Justice Doll, a YWAM ministry. She shared her experience with her friends recently (see http://us6.campaign-archive1.com/?u=5871ff8192&id=9321bed718). Can we join her to see and to pray with God’s eyes for beautiful Ocean View?

I got to stay in this cozy, adorable, little, yellow mission house…

…filled with Scriptures and pictures of the people in the neighborhood, stories of the challenges and victories and abundant with love.

It seems so far removed from its surroundings because of how you feel in the house, yet those that have lived in the house have invested, loved, cared, been in the nitty-gritty of, and rejoiced over its surroundings.

My amazing housemate took the time to show me around and explained to me the history of Ocean View. She shared about the families in the area, took me to church, and invited me into this space that teeters between over-coming and just-getting-by.

There are kids who grew up in Ocean View and prospered and raised their families seemingly unscathed by what goes on around them, and there are kids who grew up to reciprocate the violence around them.
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Who Do I Value? How About Those Untrained, Ordinary, or Young?

Photo Credit: RachelH via StockSnap.io

Recently on a trip to Rwanda, I was reminded of something I love about Youth With A Mission.

I was attending their weekly base worship time when two young Discipleship Training School (DTS, YWAM’s entry level course) students shared a devotional on God.

At first I thought this must be so annoying to their staff to have to sit through these young ladies sharing their basic revelations about God. I imagined how many I would have sat through after twenty-three years in the mission.

But then God reminded me about the gift this is. Youth With a Mission values all people being able to be used by God. We don’t require professional degrees but rather see ordinary people being used by God.

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I Struggle With Fear. Now What?

Photo Credit: Kim Daniel via Unsplash cc

At YWAM Muizenberg’s worship evening recently, Lindsey Lautsbaugh shared about overcoming fear. We are privileged to have Lindsey bring that word to you here and hope you are encouraged IN the powerful and transforming Presence of Jesus.

As a child, my mother told me stories of her own childhood. The ones with danger were my favourite.

With her siblings, she scaled tall pine trees until they reached as close to the skinny top as possible. Then they tried to swing the treetop back and forth, bending and bowing towards the ground and back again. The sight of the thin pine tree with children swinging and clinging gave my grandmother a near heart attack. The danger made me excited and thrilled.

She also described laying on the dirt road, flat as a board against the ground. The older siblings then drove over her, wheels whirring by on either side. She could have been run over if the steering was not precise. I couldn’t hear that story enough.

Facing fear can be so thrilling when we are young. As we grow old, this can change. Fear, which once made us face challenges, grows. We don’t notice it growing; it is so gradual. Slowly, through the years, we accommodate the growing fear until we wake up one day and wonder, “How did I get to this place? Why do I struggle with fear so much?”

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