Tag - experience

1
Seeing from God’s Perspective
2
How to Cope with Reverse Culture Shock – Part 2
3
LIFE as a Worship Experience
4
Where Are You Home? The Journey to “Become Home”

Seeing from God’s Perspective

Photo Credit: Kathy Gooch

This post was originally published on the Kathy Gooch’s blog at http://scribeofhisheart.blogspot.com/2014/03/seeing-from-gods-perspective.html and is re-posted with permission.

As a full-time missionary for the past 18 years and before that taking short-term missions trips, I’ve had the privilege of traveling all over the world. I’ve seen firsthand (although not climbed!) many mountain ranges – some of the better known ones being the Himalayas, the Alps, the Rockies, the East African Highlands, and the Andes. I’ve even seen the top of Mt. Kilimanjaro from the airplane. All have been spectacular sightings that have been kept as snapshots in my memory bank.

I moved from Zimbabwe to Cape Town in 2009. In the suburb I live in, I can walk out my front door and see the ocean, and I can walk out my back door and see the mountains. More spectacular sightings. As I’m not so partial to the ocean, I’ve kept it as a spectacular sighting. For some reason, I’ve been drawn to the mountains and haven’t been satisfied leaving them as mere sightings. As intimidating as they are, I’ve wanted to experience them. The only way one can truly experience these mountains is to go through the grueling process of climbing them!

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How to Cope with Reverse Culture Shock – Part 2

Photo Credit: looking4poetry via Compfight cc

In my last article I began to open up about the issue of reverse culture shock (What is Reverse Culture Shock and Why It’s Important to Understand It). In this blog entry I would like to discuss ways that I discovered to help me handle this unpleasant experience.

When I first experienced reverse culture shock, I was not aware of what was going on. I felt depressed, discouraged, and disoriented, but I had no words to use to describe what I was feeling. I somehow came across a book called Re-Entry and found that the information imparted in this book helped me understand what I was experiencing; this knowledge in itself brought some relief. As I read this book, I was reassured that I was not the only one to go through reverse culture shock, and it gave me a vocabulary to use to be able to communicate my experience with others. If you are a missionary, I would highly recommend that you familiarise yourself with the issue of reverse culture shock so that you are prepared for when you go through it yourself or when someone you know is going through it.

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LIFE as a Worship Experience

Photo Credit: Photosightfaces via Compfight cc

I couldn’t bring myself to sing a certain line in a worship song. The worship band settled on it, hovered over it – a melodic mantra. Hands were raised; eyes closed; voices intensified all around, and yet my mouth clamped shut.

“Nothing in this world can satisfy.”

Lately, I’ve noticed this particular phrase is popular in many worship songs. Israel Houghton likes it. Maranatha Music likes it… and we YWAMers seem to like it. So, I searched for it in the Bible. I couldn’t find it.

Now, I know the singer’s true intent of this lyric, and it’s good: Money, fame, ambition, etc. are not enough to satisfy. There is no replacement for or equivalent to Jesus. However, I found myself thinking how sad it is that nothing in this world can satisfy us, after all God created the entire world just to satisfy us, delight us, marvel us, and ultimately point us to Him.

So, there I was at worship… not even able to force a hum. What was wrong with me?

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Where Are You Home? The Journey to “Become Home”

Photo Credit: Shannon Mintz  Photographer: Felicity Davies

Sometimes as missionaries and expats we do not often express the sense of loss and separation one goes through when following the call of God that moves us across countries, cultures, and/or oceans. So I am thankful for Angharad’s post last week on the “pain of saying goodbye” to home for another country (if you missed it, you can read it here: The Pain of Saying “Goodbye”). I can also understand this on a personal level. And please don’t misunderstand me; as much of this is difficult, much is also a desired, exciting, and joy-filled experience.

But at the same time and maybe after going through stages of grief and journeying through transition to living somewhere else other than my “original home” (cultural, birthplace, family, etc.), I find myself in another place emotionally and maybe spiritually too – a place that surprises me today but in a good and thankful way. A place where I survey where I now live with more fondness, even with a love that continues to deepen. Where I claim the beauty, the diversity, the people, and with contentment my heart says, “Yes.”

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